Walking with God

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And Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him. Genesis 5:24 KJV

Sometimes I just love the King James version of the Bible. Enoch was and then suddenly he was not. How boring to say he disappeared. He simply was not. Enoch and Elijah are the only two people we know of who have gone to heaven without dying. Enoch and God were so close that God just decided one day that He would just walk him right into heaven. So at 365 years old, Enoch was not.

What would it look like to walk with God all the time? Well I thought of four things. Maybe we could all benefit from this.

First, talk to Him a lot. Carry on a constant banter — a sort of running monologue  of your feelings and thoughts a little like Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof. He was always carrying on with God — wondering about this, complaining about that, sizing up a person or a situation, trying to understand. God would love it.

Second, listen for Him everywhere. This may take a little training, but Isaiah says “the mountains will burst into song, and the trees of the field will clap their hands” (Isaiah 55:12). And David tells us in Psalm 19 that “the heavens are telling the glory of God … Day to day pours forth speech and night to night reveals knowledge.” Imagine if you could really hear all this you might have to cover your ears for all the noise of God speaking through the things that He has made.

The picture I used for today’s Catch I took out the window of my room in a cheap airport hotel in Spokane, Washington. Airport hotels are not known for their scenic beauty. But I had spent the weekend at a beautiful lodge on a lake and the sun never came out once. It had its own beauty, but I never saw the colors. I kept hoping for the sun so I could get a good picture and I never got my chance until Sunday afternoon out the window of my airport hotel. It was quite a surprise. Can you find God in this picture?

Then there is also listening for Him in the culture of the world around us — the art, film, theater, journalism, novels and the stories of people’s live that show up everywhere. In all of this, listen for truth, because truth is God speaking.

Third, look for Him in the faces of all those He has made in His image. And who is that? Quite simply, everybody. Look at anyone, and you are looking into the face of God.

Finally, touch Him in the needy among you — the poor, the hurting, the homeless. Marti always says we need to touch poverty. Touch poverty and you are touching God. “Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.” (Matthew 25:40 KJV)

So you see, maybe we can walk with God, at least more than we are now. It’s all about awareness. God made us for the purpose of fellowship. He’s eager to walk with us — to share in our lives and to have us share with Him … everything.

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4 Responses to Walking with God

  1. Mark D Seguin says:

    Very interesting Catch…

  2. I’ve often wondered about those two biblical characters. Death doesn’t frighten me (Desert Storm brought that to the forefront), though I concede “dying” can be frightening. What a blessing it would be to suddenly be “not.”

    • jwfisch says:

      Yes, I hear you. Regardless of the degree to which one is buoyed by their faith, death is still a step into the unknown. It’s a major portal and no one’s really been through it and come back to tell us. I’m getting old enough to have friends who are dying. Faith is keeping them. The reality of the Holy Spirit will take them through. All the more reason to get used to “walking with God.”

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